Contact Tracing


Contact Tracing

In accordance with Kansas law, KU will not conduct or authorize contact tracing or mandate contact tracing for any person. Participation in contact tracing is voluntary and will be conducted solely through the Douglas County Health Department.

What a Person Diagnosed with COVID-19 Can Expect to Happen During Contact Tracing

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, a public health worker may call you to check-in on your health, discuss who you’ve been in contact with, and ask where you spent time while you may have been infectious and able to spread COVID-19 to others. You will also be asked to stay at home and self-isolate, if you are not doing so already.

  • Your name will not be revealed to those you may have exposed, even if they ask.
  • Self-isolation means staying at home in a specific room away from other people and pets and using a separate bathroom, if possible.
  • Self-isolation helps slow the spread of COVID-19 and can help keep your family, friends, neighbors, and others you may come in contact with healthy.
  • If you need support or assistance while self-isolating, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.
  • Symptoms of COVID-19 can include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, and diarrhea. If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek medical care. Severe symptoms include trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, confusion, inability to wake or stay awake, or bluish lips or face.
What a Close Contact Can Expect to Happen During Contact Tracing

If you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, a public health worker might contact you to inform you that you’ve been exposed to COVID-19.

If asymptomatic, you should stay at home and self-quarantine for 14 days after your last exposure. If you have symptoms, you should stay home for 10 days from the beginning of symptoms, or 72 hours after the fever is gone (without the use of fever-reducing medicine). The public health worker will help identify the dates of your self- quarantine.

  • Self-quarantine means staying home, monitoring your health, and maintaining social distancing (at least 6 feet) from others at all times.
  • If you need to be around other people or animals in or outside of the home, wear a cloth face covering. This will help protect the people around you.
  • If you need support or assistance with self-quarantine, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.

You should take your temperature twice a day, watch for symptomsof COVID-19, and notify your personal care provider if you have symptoms. You should also notify people you had close contact with recently if you become ill, so they can monitor their health. If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek medical care. Severe symptoms include trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, confusion, inability to wake or stay awake, or bluish lips or face.

(page updated 8/25/20)